Thursday, April 30, 2009

Yellow-rumped Warbler Identification

This past weekend it was gorgeous in New England. We had temperatures in the 90s in Bridgewater and I took advantage, doing yard work and going birding on Sunday. I've help out hope for the diversity of birds in the Stiles & Hart conservation area behind our house, and sure enough I saw warblers! And here I thought I had to travel all the way to Boston-area parks in order to see migratory warblers...

I picked up on their call and found a group of 3 or so among saplings and low bushes. The area small trees covered an area passing over a creek connecting two of the ponds in Stiles & Hart. I stopped and watched them for probably a half hour and even saw a Northern Waterthrush walking along and pecking at the edges of the creek but unfortunately didn't get a picture.

It was very difficult photographing them between the emerging leaves, but here are some of the best pictures. I will also point out some tips for male yellow-rumped warbler identification.

First, I notice the black inverted "V" on its breast:

Then I look for the tell-tale "yellow rump" and yellow mark on its crown:


Next I look for the yellow markings on the sides of its breast:

Here are some other great pictures I think help give different perspectives of the bird:

5 comments:

Spencer said...

Great Pictures! It's hard to focus on warblers, especially when leaves and branches are in the the way. I look forward to your next post.(Hopefully about more warblers!)

dAwN said...

I like the photos! what camera do you use?

BirdingGirl said...

@Spencer- Thanks! I know, it's very tricky. That's where the manual focus comes in. I'm trying to figure it out- I'm halfway there...

@Dawn- Thanks! I have a Canon PowerShot S2 IS. I'm going to start shopping for a zoom lens though- any experience in that department?

Susan W. said...

Awesome photos! How do you get so close? They are beautiful!!

BirdingGirl said...

@Sue- Thanks! It took LOTS of patience. I crouched in the same area for probably 20 minutes.